University of Cambridge
Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain

Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain

Department of Psychology

Skip navigation

You are in:  Home » CSLB Staff & Students » Dr Billi Randall

CSLB Staff & Students

back to list | Prof Lorraine K Tyler | Mr Hun Choi | Dr Barry Devereux | Dr Elisabeth Fonteneau | Ece Kocagoncu | Dr Billi Randall | Dr David Samu | Dr Meredith Shafto | Dr Emmanuel Stamatakis | Dr Kirsten Taylor | Dr Kamen Tsvetanov | Dr Cai Wingfield

Dr Billi Randall
Dr Billi Randall

Senior Research Associate

E-mail address: billi@csl.psychol.cam.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 (0)1223 766 454
Fax: +44 (0)1223 766 452
Address: Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain
Department of Psychology
University of Cambridge
Downing Street
Cambridge CB2 3EB UK


Research Interests

My work in the Centre for Speech, Language and the Brain currently covers the areas of morphology and semantics. I design and run experiments for use on normal and patient populations. In morphology, I am working on aspects of inflectional morphology, particularly, the past tense in English and the way that it is represented and processed in intact and damaged systems. I am particularly interested in exploring the relationship between phonological and morphological variables in the auditory comprehension of inflected words. In semantics, I have been looking at the structure of conceptual knowledge and how this may differ across the domains of living things and artefacts. I have also been working on a theoretical account of the differences between the way that nouns and verbs are processed.

I have recently completed a PhD in the relationship between lexical and syntactic processing with particular reference to morphology. My work here has been based on self-paced reading. I have manipulated type of sentential context, type of morphology (inflectional or derivational), and type of derivational affix (prefix, suffix, productive or unproductive) to explore the relationship between lexically-based morphological processing and higher level processes, such as syntax.